URBAN ECONOMIC POLICY

TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATIONS

JOBS, EDUCATION
AND THE WORKFORCE


INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS

HEALTH AND
HUMAN SERVICES

ENERGY AND ENVIRONMENT

CRIMINAL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE
School Violence and
Kids from 2:00 to 8:00PM

Reauthorization of the COPS Program
The Local Law Enforcement Block Grant
Drug Availability, Treatment and Testing in Prisons
Mid-Sized Cities and
Rural Communities Methamphetamine Initiative

Immediate Action on Comprehensive Gun Safety Legislation
Federal Legislation to Combat Illegal Gun Sales
Preemption of Local Government Access to the Courts
Drug Courts

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT AND HOUSING

ARTS, CULTURE AND RECREATION

MISCELLANEOUS

USCM HOME

RESOLUTIONS INDEX

CRIMINAL AND SOCIAL JUSTICE

DRUG AVAILABILITY, TREATMENT AND TESTING IN PRISONS

WHEREAS, The United States Conference of Mayors, after holding extensive meetings across the country including The U.S. Conference of Mayors National Forum on Drug Control in 1997, has compiled "A National Action Plan to Control Drugs"; and

WHEREAS, the Action Plan states that, "for young people especially, incarceration should focus on rehabilitation, and the availability of drug treatment is essential to this; and

WHEREAS, a report issued by the National Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA), entitled "Behind Bars: Substance Abuse and America’s Prison Population," found that drug and alcohol abuse and addiction are implicated in the crimes and incarceration of 80 percent -- some 1.4 million -- of the 1.7 million men and women behind bars in America; and

WHEREAS, among these 1.4 million inmates are parents of 2.4 million children, many of them minors; and

WHEREAS, from 1993 to 1996, the number of inmates needing substance abuse treatment climbed from 688,000 to 840,000, while the number of inmates in treatment hovered around 150,000 -- with much of the treatment they are receiving being inadequate according to the CASA report; and

WHEREAS, the CASA report estimates that for an additional $6,500 a year, an inmate could be given intensive treatment, education, and job training, which upon release would provide a return on investment of $68,800 in reduced criminal activity, savings on the cost of arrest, prosecution, incarceration and health care, and benefit to the economy; and

WHEREAS, the availability of illegal narcotics in prisons across the nation is a growing problem which hinders efforts to provide treatment; and

WHEREAS, a study conducted by the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) of the Pennsylvania Prison Drug Testing Program has shown that a comprehensive drug strategy aimed at eliminating drug use in prisons can work. The Pennsylvania strategy includes using electronic drug-detection devices, increasing drug-sniffing dog teams, monitoring inmate telephone calls, conducting daily, random urine tests, and expanding substance abuse treatment, and has made Pennsylvania Prisons nearly 99 percent drug free according to the NIJ study; and

WHEREAS, The U.S. Conference of Mayors has worked closely with the Administration, especially Deputy Attorney General Eric Holder, on a policy to support drug-free prisons, increase drug treatment in prisons, and encourage the drug testing of prisoners prior to release and while on parole or probation; and

WHEREAS, the Administration has put forward a "Zero Tolerance Drug Supervision Initiative" which would support comprehensive programs for drug testing, treatment and sanctions for prisoners, parolees, and probationers; support the Drug Courts Program; and fund the Residential Substance Abuse Treatment Program,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that The U.S. Conference of Mayors supports the "Zero Tolerance Drug Supervision Initiative" and urges Congress to enact this as a positive first step in reducing the availability of drugs in prisons and ensuring that adequate monitoring and treatment exists for prisoners prior to their release back into society and while on probation or parole; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the nation’s governors, who control state prison systems and receive federal funding in support of prison construction, implement tougher controls to keep drugs out of prisons and increase the availability of treatment to meet demand, so that every prisoner, upon release, has received adequate treatment and has been tested to be drug-free, and continues to be tested and receive treatment if needed while on probation or parole; and

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the federal government should adopt a policy that every prisoner pass a drug test prior to release from the federal prison system, and continues to be tested and receive treatment if needed while on probation or parole.

TOP