URBAN ECONOMIC POLICY

TRANSPORTATION
AND COMMUNICATIONS

JOBS, EDUCATION
AND THE WORKFORCE

Federal Minimum Hourly Wage Rate Adjustment
Public Education: The Future of Our Cities
Expanding Quality After-School and
Out-of-School Time Programs

Effective Transition to
and Implementation of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998

Youth Activities in the Workforce Investment Act
Welfare-to-Work
Welfare Reform: Reinvesting State Welfare Savings and Greater Coolaboration
Accreditation of
Childcare, Early Education
and School Aged Care
Programs

Publicly-Funded, Transitional Jobs for the Hard-to-Employ

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RESOLUTIONS INDEX

JOBS, EDUCATION AND THE WORKFORCE

FEDERAL MINIMUM HOURLY WAGE RATE ADJUSTMENT

WHEREAS, the current federal minimum hourly wage rate is inadequate to raise families out of poverty; and

WHEREAS, the real value of the minimum wage continues to fall short since its highest level in 1968; and

WHEREAS, the purchasing power of the minimum wage continues to fall short and fails to allow families to make ends meet; and

WHEREAS, millions of workers paid by the hour earn at or below minimum wage and the majority of minimum wage workers are adults; and

WHEREAS, the poverty line for a family of four leaves many minimum wage earners unable to survive and they are the sole breadwinners for their households; and

WHEREAS, the majority of the average share of household income is earned by a minimum wage worker; and

WHEREAS, the income disparities between the races have been widening, not narrowing; and

WHEREAS, the minimum wage is one factor in these wide income disparities, as minorities work disproportionately in minimum wage jobs; and

WHEREAS, these minimum wage jobs often lack medical, sick or vacation leave, other benefits and job security; and

WHEREAS, these minimum wage jobs are a major factor in the decision of millions of workers who would likely drop out of the labor force because they see no future in such employment, but there are no other alternatives to raise a family; and

WHEREAS, many citizens who cannot survive on minimum wage seek alternatives outside the traditional job market that may, at time, be destructive to them, their families, and the total society; and

WHEREAS, studies have shown that raising the minimum wage does not result in job losses,

NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the federal minimum hourly wage rate should be increased to encourage significantly greater labor force participation and enable minimum wage job holders to support themselves and their families at income levels above the nationally defined poverty level.

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